Friday, November 14, 2014

New, Very Elegant Songs and Dances


New, Very Elegant Songs and Dances
Nov. 15, 2014, 8PM

Heliconian Hall, Toronto
John Edwards - Lutes



Petite fantasie dessus l'accord du Leut   Adrian Le Roy (c. 1520-1598)
Pavane est il conclud/Gaillarde est
il conclud/Passameze


Fantasie                                             Albert de Rippe (c.1500-51)
Benedicta, a Six/Secunda pars,     Josquin de Prez (d.1521)/Rippe
Per illud ave/Tertia pars, Nunc mater                 

Les commandemens de Dieu/Jubilate  Genevan Psalter, arr. Le Roy
Deo omnis/Nunc dimittis/Ecce Nunc                 



Preambulo Secundo          Giulio Cesare Barbetta (1540-1603)
Ungay Bergier                    Thomas Crecquillon/Barbetta
BonJour mon Ceur            Orlando Lassus/Sixt Kargel (d. c. 1594)
Madonna mia pieta             Lasso/Kargel
Passamezo Zorzy/Il suo salterello   Kargel

Intermission
Sanserre, Basse dance/Pavane P.B./   Pierre Blondeau? (fl. 1520s)
Gaillarde/Branle gay                 

La Magdalena, Basse danse P.B./      Blondeau?
(Tourdion)/(Recoupe)



Prelude                                      Blondeau?
Secoures moy                              Claudin de Sermisy/Blondeau?
Tant que vivray                           Sermisy/Blondeau?
Jouissance                                      Sermisy/Blondeau?

Pavane la Milanoise/Gaillarde/  Guillaume Morlaye (c. 1510-c. 1558)
Gaillarde piemontoise/Gaillarde                 



Fantasia                           Jean Paul Paladin (fl. 1540-1560)
Anchor che col partir      Cipriano di Rore/Paladin

Premier Branle de bourgogne/Second       Le Roy
branle/Tiers branle/Quatreyesme branle                  

Program Note
In the 18th century Johann Matheson joked ‘if a lute player lives to be 80 he has surely spent 60 years tuning’. Adrian Le Roy, a lutenist at the French court, makes this joke 175 years earlier with the Fantasie with which we begin. Beside his court job Le Roy formed a publishing house with Ballard, printing chansons, and from 1551, several books of lute and guitar music and a lute method surviving only in a contemporary English translation. The decorated repeats of the Pavane and Gaillarde that Le Roy gives us are marked ‘plus diminuée’ or in the English version of the Passameze, ‘more shorter’.

Albert de Rippe, born Alberto da Ripa, was another Royal lutenist, who came from the lute-mad territory of the Marchesa of Mantua, Isabella d’Este. At the end of the dense polyphony of the first part of his heavily decorated version of Josquin’s six-voice motet he realizes the lute can’t compete with a choir imitating the Archangel Gabriel saluting the Virgin Mary, so dazzles with a flurry of notes rather than full throats. Josquin thins out to two voices for the second part and brings all the voices back at the end of the third. After this Le Roy’s busy versions of tunes from the Genevan Psalter, in use by French Protestants and still in the hymnbook today, seem like pop music. Le Roy sticks close to the chords of their first harmonizer Claude Goudimel, but puts the Psalm tune in the top voice and avoids decorating it in the main, keeping the ‘more shorter’ notes in the other parts.


Pierre Attaingnant published a book of dances in 1521, the first printed lute music in France. Many of the dances are by a ‘P.B.’, probably Pierre Blondeau, a lutenist active at the time who may have been his editor. The book contains some of the new Pavanes and Gaillardes, but also many Basse Danses, an older dance form which are audibly more ‘medieval’ sounding with their uneven phrase lengths and less tonal melodies and harmonies. In 1529 Attaingnant printed a book of chansons arranged for one voice and lute from 4 voice part originals and, overleaf from each song, lute alone. The Branles are formalized versions of rustic dances but not so domesticated as to have the phrases ironed out into squares.
Morlaye was another publisher/lutenist and we can never be sure if he is editor or composer of the music in his books. The fantasy by Paladin (the Milanese Giovanni Paolo Paladino, publishing in Lyon) is unattributed in one of Morlaye’s books.


Pity Nicholas Sarkozy. You can still see him on YouTube saying ‘it’s nice to be here in Germany’ while visiting the French Region of Alsace, the capital of which is Strasbourg, where Barbetta and Kargel’s books were printed back when it was in Germany. Even the French President can’t keep straight what country it’s in.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Motets with Symphonies


The Principal’s Music Series at St. Michael’s College 
Sing Praise Upon the Lute and Viol

The Musicians In Ordinary for the Lutes
and Voices

present

Motets with Symphonies

Fr. Madden Auditorium, Carr Hall
St. Michael’s College
Oct. 24, 2014
Lecture 7:30PM, Concert 8PM

Sinfonia Terzo Tuono from Op. 22                 Biagio Marini (1594-1663)
Stabat Mater                         Giovanni Felice Sances (c.1600-1679)

Sonata Prima                                      Giovanni Batista Fontana (d. c. 1630)

Preludio 2do                               Giovanni Girolamo Kapsberger (d. 1651)
Vocem jucunditatis                   Alessandro Grandi (c.1580-1630)

Canzon Seconda                                Giovanni Gabrieli (1557-1617)

Preludio 3zo                                      Kapsberger
O Quam tu pulchra                          Grandi

Canzon Quarta                                  Gabrieli

O vos omnes                                    Grandi

Canzona II from Op. 8                   Marini

Sinfonia Quinto Tuono from Op. 22 Marini
Confitebor tibi ala francese            Claudio Monteverdi (1567-1643)

The Musicians In Ordinary
Named after the singers and lutenists who performed in the most intimate quarters of the Stuart monarchs’ palace, The Musicians In Ordinary for the Lutes and Voices dedicate themselves to the performance of early solo song and vocal chamber music. Soprano Hallie Fishel and lutenist John Edwards have been described as ‘winning performers of winning music’. A fixture on the Toronto early music scene for over 10 years, in 2012 MIO became Ensemble in Residence at St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto. They have concertized across North America and lecture regularly at universities and museums. Institutions where MIO have performed range from the scholarly to those for a more general public and include the Shakespeare Society of America, the Renaissance Society of America, the Shakespeare Association of America, Grinnell College, the Universities of Alberta, Toronto and at California at San Diego, the Kingston Opera Guild, Syracuse, Trent and York Universities and the Bata Shoe Museum. They have been Ensemble in Residence at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania.


Christopher Verrette has been a member of the violin section of Tafelmusik since 1993 and is a frequent soloist and leader with the orchestra. He holds a BMus and a Performer’s Certificate from Indiana University and contributed to the development of early music in the American Midwest as a founding member of the Chicago Baroque Ensemble and Ensemble Voltaire, and as a guest director with the Indianapolis Baroque Orchestra. He collaborates with many ensembles around North America, performing music from seven centuries on violin, viola, rebec,vielle and viola d’amore. He was concertmaster for a recording of rarely heard classical symphonies for an anthology by Indiana University Press and collaborated with Sylvia Tyson on the companion recording to her novel, Joyner’s Dream.

Patricia Ahern has a BA and BMus from Northwestern University, MMus from Indiana University, and performer diploma from the Schola Cantorum in Basel, Switzerland. She taught baroque violin at the Freiburg Conservatory and Oberlin’s Baroque Performance Institute, and has given masterclasses at McGill, Wilfrid Laurier, York and Grand Valley State Universities, and the Universities of Windsor, Wisconsin and Toronto. She has concertized on five continents and performed with Milwaukee Baroque, Ars Antigua, Chicago Opera Theater, Kingsbury Ensemble, Aradia, I Furiosi, Newberry Consort, Musica Pacifica, and the Carmel Bach Festival. Tricia has recorded for Sony, Naxos, and Analekta, and joined Tafelmusik in 2002.

 
Eleanor Verrette began her studies on violin in Toronto with Gretchen Paxson and Aisslinn Nosky, going on to study viola in Montréal with Pemi Paull and Anna-Belle Marcotte at McGill University. She graduated from McGill University in 2012 with a Bachelor's in viola performance.  She appears regularly with the Musicians In Ordinary, and is featured on recent album releases by acclaimed folk-rock artists Lakes of Canada and Corinna Rose. She has also performed with Aradia Ensemble and Montréal singer-songwriter Ari Swan, and plays vielle as a founding member of the Pneuma Ensemble.

 

Kerri McGonigle is the Artistic Director of the Academy Concert Series. Recipient of the Margarita Heron Pine String Prize and the Beryl Barns Graduate Scholarship, Kerri graduated with a Master of Music degree in cello performance from the University of Alberta. While studying in Paris, she won Premier Prix with unanimous distinction in violoncello and chamber music from the Gennevilliers Conservatory. Having completed an Advanced Certificate in Baroque Performance with Tafelmusik through the University of Toronto, Kerri is based in Toronto and performs regularly as a soloist, recitalist, chamber musician and orchestral cellist. Kerri spends her days running after and cuddling her beautiful 16-month old son, practicing cello while he naps – thankfully he is a great sleeper!


In 1620 Monteverdi wrote to his opera librettist explaining why he couldn’t possibly get away to Mantua. Apart from his duties at St. Mark’s Church, Venice…

‘there is the Most Illustrious Primicerius, for whom every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, I make music in a certain oratory of his, to which half the nobility come.’

This ‘Primericus’ was Marc’Antonio Cornaro, from a family that included doges, queens and cardinals. Between him and the ‘half the nobility’, had Monteverdi applied to the Toronto Arts Council for these exclusive performances he would not have been ticking the boxes to obtain extra points for promoting art music in ‘at-risk neighbourhoods.’

In 1628 the governing council of the Church of Santa Maria Maggiore in Bologna, where Alessandro Grandi, formerly Monteverdi’s second-in-command at St. Mark’s, was now maestro di capella, issued a memo that tells a different story.

‘Since in winter Vespers of feasts are sung at a time when few can attend, the majority still being at dinner, music is made to an empty church; the deputies propose that winter services should be put forward half or three-quarters of an hour to give the nobility and the townsfolk time to be able to come; it would be a good thing if the whole of Vespers were sung, with some motet to draw the people in and uplift them to devotion, particularly as so much is spent on the music that it ought to be of profit to all.’

The governing council seems to have been eager, then, to disseminate the spiritual benefits to be reaped from listening to music. However, upon his arrival at his new gig Grandi did an inventory of Santa Maria’s music library which has survived. Though they liked Grandi’s music enough to hire him, the library is full of Palestrina generation ‘da capella’ music rather than the new small scale and drama driven baroque style with and without instruments. Did Santa Maria engage Grandi to update their music program or were Grandi’s books of motets for one to three voices ‘con sinfonie’ composed more for and consumed more by the great and the good at their ‘certain oratories’? Or perhaps both as the great and good on the church council wanted to give to the townsfolk the spiritual thrills and chills that the baroque style shared with opera and which they had access to.

The peripatetic Biagio Marini did much to spread the baroque style north of the Alps on his constant search for a better job. He worked as a bass singer and violinist under Monteverdi at St. Mark’s for a time and much of his music was printed in Venice. We insert one of his Sinfonie as a ritornello into Sances’s Stabat Mater, also published in Venice. Marini may have studied violin with Giovanni Battista Fontana whose sonatas were also published there after his death.

Monteverdi’s Confitebor tibi ala francese has at the top the suggestion ‘for five voices, or if you like, with four violins, leaving the soprano voice solo’, which we do this evening. 



Translations

Pianto della Madona – Stabat mater
The sorrowful Mother stood
beside the cross weeping
while her Son hung there.
She whose grieving soul,
compassionate and sorrowful,
a sword pierced through.

O how sad and afflicted
was that blessed
Mother of the Only-begotten!
She who mourned and grieved
and trembled to see
the punishment of her glorious Son.
Who is the man who would not weep,
if he beheld the Mother of Christ
in such suffering?
Who could not feel sorrow,
contemplating the devoted Mother
suffering with her Son?

For the sins of His people
she saw Jesus in torment
and subjected to scourging.
She beheld her sweet Son
dying forsaken
as He gave up His spirit.
O Mother, fount of love,
make me feel the force of sorrow,
that I may mourn with you.
Make my heart on fire
with love of Christ God,
that I may please Him.
Holy Mother, grant this:
fix the wounds of the Crucified
firmly in my heart.
Your wounded Son,
who deigned to suffer so much for me:
share with me His punishment.

Make me truly to weep with you,
sorrowing with the Crucified,
for as long as I live.
To stand with you beside the Cross,
and willingly share
in your mourning, this I desire.
Virgin of Virgins most renowned,
do not be bitter to me now.
Make me mourn with you.

Make me bear the death of Christ,
make me a sharer in His passion,
and recall His wounds.
Make me wounded with His wounds,
inebriated by this cross,
for the sake of your Son’s love.
Inflamed and kindled
by you, Virgin, may I be defended
in the day of judgment.
Let me be protected by the cross,
safeguarded by the death of Christ,
and nurtured by His grace.
When my body dies,
grant that my soul may be given
the glory of paradise. Amen.

Vocem jucunditatis
Declare it with the voice of joy, and make it known, alleluia.
The Lord hath delivered His people, alleluia.
Christ has ascended on high. He has led captivity captive. He has given gifts to mankind, alleluia.

O Quam tu pulchra es
O how beautiful you are, my love, my dove, my pretty one. Your eyes are like a doves. Your hair is like a flock of goats.
Your teeth are like a flock of ewes ready for shearing. Come from Lebanon, come my love, my dove, my pretty one. O how beautiful you are, come. Arise my bride, arise my delight, arise my immaculate one. Arise and come, for I am sick with love.

O vos omnes
O all ye that pass by the way, look and see if there be any sorrow like to my sorrow.
Be astonished, O ye heavens, at this; and ye gates thereof be very desolate.

Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth, and be astonished because of this.
I reared children, but they have rebelled against me, those I fed with manna in the wilderness, they gave me gall for my food, and the water of salvation I have given them, they, however, in my thirst, they gave me vinegar to drink.
Take heed, therefore, and see if there be any sorrow like to my sorrow.

Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth, and be amazed at this.
As for the sons I exalted them, but they have rebelled against me.
I have opened the sea before them, and they have opened my side with a spear.
I scourged the Egyptian side on their account, and they scourged me and handed me over.
Take heed, therefore, and see if there be any sorrow like to my sorrow.

Confitebor tibi Domine
I will praise thee, O Lord, with my whole heart; in the council of the just: and in the congregation.
Great are the works of the Lord: sought out according to all his wills.
His work is praise and magnificence: and his justice continueth for ever and ever.
He hath made a remembrance of his wonderful works, being a merciful and gracious Lord:
He hath given food to them that fear him. He will be mindful for ever of his covenant:
He will shew forth to his people the power of his works.
That he may give them the inheritance of the Gentiles: the works of his hands are truth and judgment.
All his commandments are faithful: confirmed for ever and ever, made in truth and equity.
He hath sent redemption to his people: he hath commanded his covenant for ever. Holy and terrible is his name:
The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom. A good understanding to all that do it: his praise continueth for ever and ever.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit.
As it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Thursday, September 11, 2014


Heliconian Hall Series 
Heliconian Hall
35 Hazelton Ave. (near Bay Subway)
Tickets at the door $30/$20 students & seniors

For over a decade Hallie Fishel, soprano, and John Edwards, lutes and guitars, have brought Toronto very elegant songs which, though old, will be ‘new’ to many listeners. In some cases works from our raids of original prints and manuscripts which have lain on library shelves for centuries have been given their North American debut by us.

Nov. 15, 2014 at 8PM
New, Very Elegant Songs and Dances
French solo lute music (and some by Italian immigrants) of the 16th century played by John Edwards. As well as music published in Paris from the royal lutenists Albert de Rippe (the Mantuan Alberto da Ripa) and the homegrown Guillaume Morlaye you will hear the European union of lute music from Lyon (Jean-Paul Paladin/Paladino) and the now French, then German city of Strasbourg where Sixtus Kargel published his collection of dances and songs arranged for the lute Novae, elegantissimae, Gallicae, item et Italicae cantilenae, Mutetæ & Passomezo, adiunctis suis Saltarellis…

Jan. 1, 2015 at 2PM & 2, 2015 at 8PM
A New Year’s Day Concert
After all the pre-Christmas Messiahs and A Baroque Christmas programs, you will have a week off so you will be ready for our annual concert of High Baroque music  with Hallie Fishel, soprano and John Edwards on archlute, with Christopher Verrette and Patricia Ahern, Baroque violins and Borys Medicky, harpsichord. The only new year’s alternative to Strauss waltzes.


Mar. 7, 2015 at 8PM
Donne on Love and Death 
John Donne’s poem An Epithalamion, or Marriage Song On the Lady Elizabeth and Count Palatine Being Married on St. Valentine’s Day and his A Nocturnal upon St. Lucy's Day read by scholar and author Seth Lerer with songs by Campion, Dowland and others sung by Hallie Fishel with John Edwards on Renaissance lutes. Music and sweet poetry will be demonstrated to be in such steadfast agreement that it will not be doubted that ‘One god is god of both, as poets feign.’



May 2, 2015 at 8PM
In Stile Moderno
Claudio Monteverdi has been called ‘the creator of modern music’ and Salamone Rossi has been credited with the invention of the trio sonata. We present the then avant garde music of Monteverdi and Rossi and their contemporaries at the court of the Dukes of Mantua. Hallie Fishel sings and John Edwards plays theorbo and lute, with Christopher Verrette and Patricia Ahern playing Renaissance violins.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014


The Principal’s Music Series at St. Michael’s College

Sing Praise Upon the Lute and Viol

Fr. Madden Auditorium, Carr Hall, 100 St Joseph St.
St. Michael's College, University of Toronto
Tickets $30, $20 students and seniors at the door.
One of last year's shows in Madden Auditorium
As Ensemble-in-Residence at St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto, we present a series of concerts 16th and 17th century sacred domestic music for voice, strings led by Christopher Verrette, and lutes. A pre-concert talk at 7:30PM puts the music in context. Concerts at 8PM.


In 1620 Monteverdi wrote to his opera librettist Striggio explaining why he couldn’t possibly get away to Mantua. Apart from his duties at St. Mark’s Church, ‘there is the Most Illustrious Primicerius, for whom every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, I make music in a certain oratory of his, to which half the nobility come.’ Similarly Byrd and other Elizabethan composers created domestic sacred music for voice and viols or violins. And of course, we can imagine the guilty melancholic evaporating his thoughts to his lute.

Psalms, Songs and Sonnets – Sep. 26, 2014
Consort songs, motets and In Nomines for strings, and lute music by Byrd, Lassus, Dowland and others with a violin band. Music from the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras which shows a bubbling stewpot of music sacred and secular, Catholic and Protestant, full of subtle craftsmanship and even a little dazzle.

Motets With Symphonies – Oct 24, 2014
In the dedication to the Holy Roman Empress, Monteverdi says her protection gave him the confidence ‘to bring to light this spiritual and moral wood’. We present his Confitebor Tibi ala Francese (‘if you like, with four violins, leaving the soprano voice solo’), Grandi’s O vos omnes and other music from Monteverdi’s Selva Morale e Spirituale and Grandi’s Motetti con Sinfonie and sonatas for strings and theorbo.

The Cure of Religious Melancholy – Jan. 30, 2015
Robert Burton published his treatise an Anatomy of Melancholy in the last years of the reign of James I, when religious melancholy, which Burton puts in the section of his book on Love Melancholy, was a real problem among the ‘Godly’. He also tells us one cure is ‘Music of all sorts aptly applied’. We combine the ‘passionate pavans’ of John Dowland’s Lachrimæ or seaven teares for violins and lute with some of his airs, consort songs and music in memory of his beloved friend Sir Henry Noel.

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

The Suavity of Sound that is Born of the Lute

Apr. 26, 2014, 8PM
Heliconian Hall, Toronto 

Playing these first pieces on a big lute like this one in a painting by Cariani 
Recercare Francesco Spinacino (fl. 1507)
Malor me bat Johannes Martini (d. 1498) arr. Spinacino

Pavana alla Ferrarese – Joan Ambrose Dalza (fl.1508)
Salterello – Piva
These next pieces on a little lute like this one also in a picture by Cariani
Tastar da corde Dalza
Poi che volse Bartolomeo Tromboncino (d. aft. 1535) arr.Dalza

Ricercare Sesto – Giovanni Maria da Crema (fl. 1540–50)
Passamezzo Louetta – Saltarello Louetta

These next pieces on this lute after the Warwick Frei made by Mike Schreiner
Recerchar secondo Vincenzo Capirola (1474–aft.1548)
O mia ciecha e dura sorte Marco Cara (c.1470–1525) arr. Capirola
Che farala Don Michele Vincenti (fl. 1515) arr. Capirola

Et in terra pax – Josquin de Prés (c.1450–1521) arr. Capirola
Qui tolis pechata mondi

Balletto Capirola

Intermission

Ricercar Francesco da Milano (1497–1543)
De mon triste Jean Richafort (c.1480–c.1547) arr. Francesco
Fantasia de mon triste Francesco
The little lute by Mike Schreiner
Fantasia – Pavana Nova – Pietro Paolo Borrono (c.1490–after 1563)
Saltarello

Ricercar del duodecimo tuono – Vincenzo Galilei (c.1520–1591)
Erato – Urania – Euterpe
A woodcut from a book of tablature by Francesco da Milano, who seems
to be playing quite a big lute.
Romanesca Galilei

Fantasia Cosimo Bottegari (1564–1620)
Ancor che col partire Cipriano de Rore (1515/16–1565) arr. Bottegari
And this last set on the little lute again, Bartolomeo Veneto, first decade of the 16th c. 
Ballo alla Tedesca – Ballo Bottegari
Forestiere – Romanesca

‘Most Gentle Spirits,’ the publisher Francesco Marcolini addresses the readers of a book of Intabolatura di leuto in 1536, ‘Although all wind and string instruments, because they retain the quality of the harmony that issues from the spheres while the heavens move, are sweet, the suavity of sound that is born of the lute, by making itself heard in the soul, robs the senses of those that hear it.’ Marcolini is putting a ‘hard sell’ on the gentle spirits of the readership, but the lute was a special instrument in the Renaissance imagination, taking the place, for them, of the Ancient Greek lyre. The lutenist was not like some ‘lacqui on the violin’, but was in the tradition of the lyrist in The Odyssey, or even the semi-divine Orpheus himself. Francesco da Milano, lutenist to two Medici popes, felt his revered position as an artist gave him license to stop playing and require two of the pope’s chatty guests to pay attention at an after-dinner concert. This at a time when crossing a Medici could get you hung out a window on a sharp hook.
A page from the Capirola Lute Book, the beginning of his
arrangement of the Gloria from Josquin's Missa Pange Lingua
We have a fair few anecdotes about Francesco da Milano, but we know nothing of Spinacino, to whom the proto-music-publisher Petrucci gave the honour of being the first composer of specifically instrumental music to see his work in print. Well, ‘specifically instrumental music’? Most of Spinacino’s book consisists of improvisatory ‘ricerecars’ and arragements of vocal music. Intabulating chansons, frottole, madrigals and even large Mass movements (Capirola decorates the Gloria from Josquin’s Missa Pange Lingua so heavily it is hard to find the original plainsong) became a staple of Italian lute music in the Renaissance.

Ground basses became a favourite organising principal too. The Romanesca, chord changes imported from Spain where it was called Guard My Cows and exported to England where it was called Greensleeves, was a favourite till Monteverdi’s day.

And there are the dances; from pavane (a slow dance where one parades ones finery: pavo=peacock?) and salterelli (‘little jumping’ dance), sometimes built on the passamezzo ground bass, to the more up to date gagliardi (Galilei wrote galliards to many Classical figures; here are the ones for the Muses of song, astronomy and lyric poetry) and a couple of rustic ones from Bottegari’s Songbook.

Tuesday, April 1, 2014


The program and notes for tonight's concert:

Pergolesi Stabat Mater
Biber Confitebor Tibi and Litaniæ Lauretanæ

The Musicians In Ordinary
Hallie Fishel-Soprano, Charlotte Burrage-Mezzo-Soprano
Led by Christopher Verrette

St. Michael’s Schola Cantorum
Directed by Michael O’Connor

Tuesday, April 1st, 2014  7:30pm

Sonata V from Armonico Tributo     Georg Muffat (1653-1704)
Allemanda
Adagio
Fuga
Adagio
Passacaglia (Grave)

Litaniæ Lauretanæ       Heinrich Biber (1644-1704)
Hallie Fishel, soprano; Charlotte Burrage, Mezzo; Adam Miceli, Tenor; Christian McConnell, Bass

Confitebor tibi Domine      Biber
Hallie Fishel, soprano; Charlotte Burrage, Mezzo; Adam Miceli, Tenor; Christian McConnell, Bass

Stabat Mater     Giovanni Battista Pergolesi (1710-1736)

This concert marks and celebrates the culmination of this year’s doings at St. Michael’s College. How exciting it is for us, then, to perform for you two pieces from Biber’s collection of Vespers music, published in Salzburg in 1693. Throughout the past year The Musicians In Ordinary have presented Christopher Verrette performing Biber’s Rosary sonatas, with contemporary motets in Madden Auditorium. Biber’s choral works dedicated to his employer the Archbishop of Salzburg offer a fascinating contrast to the rhapsodic and contemplative sonatas.

As you can see from the title page of the collection, it contains all the psalms one might need for Vespers throughout the year and a litany for four voices to which, if you please, you can add a choir and even brass at places marked in the score.

In the prefaces to his books of instrumental music Muffat thoroughly details this kind of ”additive” scoring. He tells us that you could play his pieces with a little trio of two violins and a bass, to which you can add a theorbo or keyboard, and then “insofar as you may have a greater number of musicians at your disposal you may assign additional players... To make the harmony of the bass more majestic, a large double bass will prove most serviceable.” Again, Muffat provides solo and tutti markings for the “light and shade” contrasts so beloved of Baroque painters, as well as musicians. Muffat continues, “For by exactly observing this opposition of rivalry of the slow and the fast, the loud and the soft, the fullness of the great choir and the delicacy of the little trio, the ear is ravished by a singular astonishment, as is the eye by the opposition of light and shade.”


Traditionally it has been said that Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater was commissioned by the Confraternità dei Cavalieri di San Luigi di Palazzo to replace, or ‘soup up’ a similar setting by Alessandro Scarlatti, their former maestro di capella, which uses only two violins, soprano and alto soloists, and continuo. Scarlatti’s setting was performed on every Friday in Lent. Pergolesi wrote the Stabat Mater in the spa town of Pozzuoli where he was trying, unsuccessfully, to recover from tuberculosis.

It is hard to tell how much the romantic tale of the young genius struggling to complete his masterwork as he coughed out his last breath played a part in the astonishing popularity the Stabat Mater had in the following decades. Bach adapted it for a German cantata, Alexander Pope wrote an ode to fit the music, versions for solo keyboard and even violin solo versions of the fugal movements were adapted. Perhaps it was the decline of castrato singers, particularly in church, in the early 19th century that inspired an arrangement for four-part male chorus. Certainly the 19th century operas on and a “biography” of Pergolesi’s life contain much fiction.

The Stabat Mater imports from the opera a direct and dramatic harmonic vocabulary which had a great influence on the Classical style of Mozart and Haydn. Perhaps the tale of the composer penning his great sacred work on his deathbed influenced the biographers of Mozart as well.

The Musicians In Ordinary
Named after the singers and lutenists who performed in the most intimate quarters of the Stuart monarchs’ palace, The Musicians In Ordinary for the Lutes and Voices dedicate themselves to the performance of early solo song and vocal chamber music. Soprano Hallie Fishel and lutenist John Edwards have been described as “winning performers of winning music.” A fixture on the Toronto early music scene for over 10 years, MIO became Ensemble in Residence at St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto in 2012. They have concertized across North America and lecture regularly at universities and museums. MIO have performed at a range of institutions, from the scholarly to those for a more general public, including the Shakespeare Society of America; the Renaissance Society of America; Canadian Society for Renaissance Studies; Grinnell College; the Universities of Alberta, Toronto and California at San Diego; the Kingston Opera Guild; Syracuse, Trent, and York Universities; and the Bata Shoe Museum. They have been Ensemble in Residence at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania.

Originally from Woodstock, Ontario, Charlotte Burrage is a COC Ensemble Studio member and placed third in the COC Ensemble Studio Competition. Credits include Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater with Kevin Mallon in Italy and Christopher Verrette in Toronto; Hansel in Hansel and Gretel (Vancouver Opera in Schools); Dorabella in Così fan tutte (Banff Centre and Jeunesses Musicales); and the title role in Massenet’s Cendrillon (University of British Columbia). She also performed with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra under Bramwell Tovey and was the alto soloist in the Bach Magnificat at UBC. She holds a Master of Music in voice performance from the University of Toronto and graduated from UBC’s opera diploma program. This season she sang with Orchestra London in Handel’s Messiah and made her COC mainstage debut singing Dorabella in the Ensemble Studio performance of Così fan tutte.

Christopher Verrette has been a member of the violin section of Tafelmusik since 1993 and is a frequent soloist and leader with the orchestra. He holds a Bachelor of Music and a Performer’s Certificate from Indiana University. He contributed to the development of early music in the American Midwest as a founding member of the Chicago Baroque Ensemble and Ensemble Voltaire and as a guest director with the Indianapolis Baroque Orchestra. He collaborates with many ensembles around North America, performing music from seven centuries on violin, viola d’amore, viola, rebec, and vielle. He was concertmaster for a recording of rarely heard classical symphonies for a recently released anthology by Indiana University Press and collaborated with Sylvia Tyson on the companion recording to her novel, Joyner’s Dream.

St Michael’s Schola Cantorum is an ad hoc group drawn from staff, faculty, and graduate and undergraduate students of the University of St Michael’s College, as well as members of St Basil’s parish choir.

Michael O’Connor has been Director of Music at St Basil’s Church since 2010, and is an Associate of the Royal School of Church Music. He teaches in the college programs at St Michael’s and runs a weekly singing club on campus. His academic scholarship and practical music-making overlap in the theory and practice of liturgical music.

Litaniæ Lauretanæ
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, hear us. Christ, graciously hear us.

God the Father of heaven, have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world, have mercy on us.
God the Holy Spirit, have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, one God, have mercy on us.

Holy Mary, pray for us.
Holy Mother of God, pray for us.
Holy Virgin of virgins.
Mother of Christ.
Mother of divine grace.
Mother most pure,
Mother most chaste.
Mother inviolate.
Mother undefiled.
Mother most amiable.
Mother most admirable.
Mother of our Creator.
Mother of our Saviour.
Virgin most prudent.
Virgin most venerable.
Virgin most renowned.
Virgin most powerful.
Virgin most merciful.
Virgin most faithful.
Mirror of justice.
Seat of wisdom.
Cause of our joy.
Spiritual vessel.
Vessel of honour.
Singular vessel of devotion.
Mystical rose.
Tower of David.
Tower of ivory.
House of gold.
Ark of the covenant.
Gate of heaven.
Morning star.
Health of the sick.
Refuge of sinners.
Comforter of the afflicted.
Help of Christians.
Queen of Angels.
Queen of Patriarchs.
Queen of Prophets.
Queen of Apostles.
Queen of Martyrs.
Queen of Confessors.
Queen of Virgins.
Queen of all Saints.

Lamb of God, who take away the sins of the world, spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, who take away the sins of the world, graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, who take away the sins of the world, have mercy on us.


Confitebor tibi Domine (Ps. 110)
I will praise thee, O Lord, with my whole heart; in the council of the just: and in the congregation. Great are the works of the Lord: sought out according to all his wills.  His work is praise and magnificence: and his justice continueth for ever and ever. He hath made a remembrance of his wonderful works, being a merciful and gracious Lord: He hath given food to them that fear him. He will be mindful for ever of his covenant: He will shew forth to his people the power of his works.  That he may give them the inheritance of the Gentiles: the works of his hands are truth and judgment. All his commandments are faithful: confirmed for ever and ever, made in truth and equity. He hath sent redemption to his people: he hath commanded his covenant for ever. Holy and terrible is his name: The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom. A good understanding to all that do it: his praise continueth for ever and ever.

Stabat Mater
Duet
The sorrowful Mother stood
beside the cross weeping
while her Son hung there.

Soprano Aria
She whose grieving soul,
compassionate and sorrowful,
a sword pierced through.

Duet
O how sad and afflicted
was that blessed
Mother of the Only-begotten!

Alto Aria
She who mourned and grieved
and trembled to see
the punishment of her glorious Son.

Duet
Who is the man who would not weep,
if he beheld the Mother of Christ
in such suffering?

Who could not feel sorrow,
contemplating the devoted Mother
suffering with her Son?

For the sins of His people
she saw Jesus in torment
and subjected to scourging.

Soprano Aria
She beheld her sweet Son
dying forsaken
as He gave up His spirit.

Alto Aria
O Mother, fount of love,
make me feel the force of sorrow,
that I may mourn with you.

Duet
Make my heart on fire
with love of Christ God,
that I may please Him.
 
Duet
Holy Mother, grant this:
fix the wounds of the Crucified
firmly in my heart.

Your wounded Son,
who deigned to suffer so much for me:
share with me His punishment.

Make me truly to weep with you,
sorrowing with the Crucified,
for as long as I live.

To stand with you beside the Cross,
and willingly share
in your mourning, this I desire.

Virgin of Virgins most renowned,
do not be bitter to me now.
Make me mourn with you.

Alto Aria
Make me bear the death of Christ,
make me a sharer in His passion,
and recall His wounds.

Make me wounded with His wounds,
inebriated by this cross,
for the sake of your Son’s love.

Duet
Inflamed and kindled
by you, Virgin, may I be defended
in the day of judgment.

Let me be protected by the cross,
safeguarded by the death of Christ,
and nurtured by His grace.

Duet
When my body dies,
grant that my soul may be given
the glory of paradise. Amen.

St Michael’s Schola Cantorum

Soprano
Suzanna Attia, Sana Bathiche, Kara Dymond, Laurel-Ann Finn, Hallie Fishel, Emily Sherlock

Alto
Charlotte Burrage, Irene Chan, Cindy Dymond, Irene Gaspar, Ana Iorgulescu, Mekhriban Mamedova, Annemarie Sherlock, Connie Tsui

Tenor
Reid Locklin, Antonio Manco, Adam Miceli

Bass
Eric Charron, Christian McConnell, Paul McGrath

Rehearsal Pianist – Mekhriban Mamedova

The Musicians In Ordinary Orchestra

1st Violins
Christopher Verrette, Elizabeth Loewen Andrews, Michelle Odorico

2nd Violins
Emily Eng, Rezan Onen-Lapointe

1st Viola
Charlene Yeh

2nd Viola
Eleanor Verrette

Violoncello
Laura Jones

Contrabass
Calum McLeod

Organ
Lysiane Boulva

Theorbo and Archlute
John Edwards

We hope you enjoy the program this evening celebrating the end of this academic year. Public academic and cultural events such as this are made possible by donations from Alumni and Friends of the University of St. Michael’s College.

To ensure a vibrant community on campus,
please consider making a donation.

Three convenient ways to give:
1.     Go online at https://donate.utoronto.ca/stmikes
2.     Call us at 416-926-7281 or 1-866-238-2339
3.     Mail us at 81 St. Mary Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1J4

To learn more about future public events available at the University of St. Michael’s College, please visit our website at: http://stmikes.utoronto.ca/

Thanks to -
Mike Schreiner for lute construction and maintenance,
Tafelmusik Orchestra and Thomas Linken for the use of chamber organ,
Alexandra Guerson for the MIO website design,
Rev. Lisa Wang for the translation of the Stabat Mater
Fr. Chris Valka CSB for the use of St Basil’s Church this evening.